Starting Out With a New Hanoverian Sport Horse

The Hanoverian horse has been a consistently popular breed of sport horse for a long time, and for good reason. Hanoverian horses are incredibly lithe, agile and sportive. Hanoverians are renowned for their good temperaments, which makes them easy to train to a great extent. These horses are also highly intelligent and generally form very harmonious relationships with their riders. Hanoverian sport horses are famed worldwide for their awe-inspiring grace and beauty – they possess an infallible combination of muscular limbs, a robust body and an enduringly strong back. Any horse lover, or potential investor in a sport horse would truly be wise to choose a Hanoverian sport horse.

Hanoverian sport horses can be seen at all levels of competitive games, from local horse shows to the Olympic games. In fact, statistics show that the Hanoverian breed is the most successful of all warm blood horse breeds – not surprising when their athleticism and excellent temperament are acknowledged.

Question: I have invested in a fantastic Hanoverian Sport Horse. What is my next step?

First of all, congratulations on your successful investment in a Hanoverian, anyone who has the pleasure of owning one of these horses is guaranteed many years of satisfaction and enjoyment from seeing their horse continually succeed. However, their success does not come automatically. The most important first step to take, once you have purchased your horse, is to organize its training.

High quality training with an experienced trainer is imperative to guarantee your horse’s success in competitive games. It is recommended to conduct ample research on the type of training you wish your horse to receive. Training based on classical teaching principles has proven widely popular. In many cases, the classical teaching principles are applied during training, while the trainer simultaneously forms a specific program based on the unique needs of the horse undergoing training, taking their personality traits and physical strengths into close consideration.

When researching and deciding on the right horse trainer for your Hanoverian horse’s needs, inquire as to the success levels in competitive games of horses that have been previously undergone training with them. This will give you a fair idea of how well the trainer works with horses and caters to their individual needs. It is also very important to introduce your horse to the trainer, and even allow them to take the horse for a ride to gauge how they collaborate with one another. Additionally, it is just as important for you, the horse owner to mesh well with the chosen trainer.

Hanoverian horses are highly intelligent and if they sense any weakness, their training may not be as successful as it could be. In the long run, it is extremely important that your Hanoverian, you and your trainer all connect well to ensure your horse’s maximum success.

Once properly trained, a Hanoverian sport horse is a tremendous opportunity for success and will bring an owner many years of enjoyment.

How to Feed and Breed Horses

Horses are herbivorous and basically exhibit hind gut fermentation. So it is very much essential to exercise proper feeding management in horses so as to obstruct both over feeding and under feeding. The salient features are highlighted regarding feeding.

1. Do not provide non nitrogenous protein substances like urea to horses of all categories as they can not digest like ruminants.

2. Horses should be provided dry matter at least 1.5% of body weight.

3. Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 2.7 for light breeds

Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 3.1 for medium breeds

Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 3.5 for heavy breeds

4. The most common concentrated feed given to horse are oats, barley, gram and wheat bran.

5. As far as green forage is concerned, best fodder is lucerne (either green or hay).

6. For better utilization and assimilation of nutrients, the whole daily ration may be divided into 4-6 separate meals.

7. Regularity in feeding, avoid full feeding before and after exercise and changing ration composition gradually are most important symbols in horse feeding.

8. In horses it is particular that fodder roughage is given before grains. but if chopped fodder is available then it can be mixed with grains or concentrate.

9. No group feeding is advised as far as grain feeding is concerned.

10. To avoid mineral deficiency, daily 25-40 gm mineral mixture is added with concentrates.

11. A horse (without work) weighing 400 kg body weight will require probably 0.38 kg Digestible crude protein (DCP), 20 gm calcium, 20 gm phosphorous and 70mg carotene.

12. For medium work, it requires 0.86 kg DCP, 50 gm Calcium, 50 gm phosphorous and 135 mg carotene.

13. And for heavy work, it requires 1.10 kg DCP, 60 gm calcium, 60 gm phosphorus and 170 mg carotene.

14. Horses should not be watered at least 20-30 minutes before and after vigorous exercise.

15. The requirement of drinking water is 36liters per day and may vary according to seasons as in summer the demand of water increases.

16. For general practise, it is to provide water before feeding.

17. In general watering schedule, watering should be done three times a day in summer and twice a day in other seasons.

18. Horses are seasonal polyestrous. Early spring is considered as best breeding time in india.

19. puberty is attained at the age of 18 months.

20. Mating should be allowed at 3 yrs of age when it attains 75% of body weight,

21. Eestrous cycle is 21 days and duration of heat is 4-6 days.

22. The should be bred 2 to 3 days after appearance of heat symptoms.

23. The tail of the mare should be bandaged and kept away to one side so as to not interfere during copulation.

24. For breeding, one stallion is sufficient for 30-40 mares.

25. A stallion should be used for 5 times in a week.

26. One most observable sight at the time of parturition is the appearance of beads of wax on teats one or two days before delivery.