*Understanding* – The First Of The 6 Keys To Building A Life Long Partnership With Your Horse

Yesterday we talked a little about the 6 Keys for a
Life Long Partnership with your horse, today I would
like to visit with you about the first key,
*Understanding.*

Have you ever wondered why your horse acts like he does
how he thinks and moves? If so, then you need to
understand the prey-predator relationship, but before
we start it’s important that you understand, if your
going to effectively communicate with horses you need
to *think like horses*. You need to look at and approach
everything from the *horse’s point of view*.

If you understand that horses are prey animals and that
*horses perceive people as predators* and realize that
each thinks differently, you can begin to understand how
your horse thinks, acts and moves, and why you react the
way you do. Understand, Both the horse and human are
simply considering all factors then adjusting to the
situation.

If you understand that horses are Prey animals by nature,
are programmed to be cowards and are herd fear-flight
animals, in other words when they perceive danger they
run and continue running until they feel they have
escaped the danger, then you can begin to develop a
deeper apreciation of why your horse acts, thinks and
moves like he does.

To horses we *humans* look and smell like *predators*.
If your going to communicate with your horse in an
effective manner then it’s necessary to prove to your
horse that you are not a predator. You need to
understand what type of behavior you need to show if
you are to get a certain behavior from your horse.

Once the horse accepts that you are not as bad as you
seem and you are not a predator he becomes gentle, in
other words he no longer perceives you to be dangerous.

In a herd of horses there is always a pecking order
and once your horse decides that you are not a danger
to him he will put you in a pecking order to fit into
his world (remember all of this is about the horse his
world and perceptions not yours) you will be placed
higher or lower depending on respect and authority.

*Remember the horse is a prey animal and is supposed to
act the way he does.** It’s your task to help him act
less like a prey animal and more like a partner. To
accomplish this you need your horse to be sensitive or
aware of your cues and communication rather than danger.

You need to turn his flight from fear reaction into
forward motion or impulsion. You have to work at getting
him to want to be with you, to take the herd instinct
and turn it into bonding with you.

The concepts you and I have discussed today are much
easier said than done. Why, because horses and humans
think differently and this is often a source of
conflict.

Let’s wrap up what we have discussed today. You will
gain respect from our horse if you uphold your
responsibilities which are: Not act like a predator,
be where you need to be emotionally when communicating
with our horse, to think like a horse and not a human
and focus on where you are headed and what you want to
do, if you do your horse will sense this, respect you
and follow you as the leader.

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In the next article we will discuss Mind Set; Your
Attitude= How you communicate. Being assertive
vs.aggressive and being evenhanded. Your mind-set
(attitude) affects the mind-set (attitude) of your
horse.

Copyright © Mike Gorzalka All Rights Reserved
Worldwide

*You have permission to publish this article electronically, in print, in your ebook or on your web
site, free of charge, as long as the content of this
article is not changed in any way and the author
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Afraid to Buy a Horse at Public Auction?

Here are 5 things to do to put the odds of getting a good horse in your favor.

Let me share a short story with you about public horse auctions and my friend Jack.

I’ll show you how to buy a horse at auction so you won’t get burned. Jack, an old time horse trader and I use to travel to horse auction all over the state. I’d just watch Jack and maybe later ask my questions.

Jack was usually pretty closed mouthed, but he let me in on his secrets to buying good horses at auctions.

#1 Arrive at the auction real early like 3 hours or more before the auction starts.

You want to be there as the horses arrive, so you can see who brings them and how they unload and walk to their pen.

Who brings the horse? A horse trader, private party, woman, man, kid, also how many horses did they bring? You need to know this so you have a clue as to who you will possibly be buying from and who to talk to about the horse before you bid.

#2 If you see a horse you like the looks of, go to the horses holding pen.

Watch the horse and how he moves. If the horse is tied up in the pen this could mean trouble as the horse owner might not want you to see the horse move. Check the horse for blemishes and soundness, make sure the legs are clean and the hooves are healthy and maintained, there should not be any limping or signs of lameness.

I do not like scars, divots or bumps on the head and neck, This shows the horse has been in a wreck of some kind, which could mean the horse is prone to panic, I’ve been stuck with a couple of panic prone horses and they did hurt me. If you don’t know about lame horses and what to watch out for, take someone with you who does or don’t bid.

Now the horse should show signs of life maybe be a little bit excited, what with all the other horses and the new surroundings, if not you could be looking at a drugged horse.

#3 Talk to the person that brought the horse

you know this person because you seen them arrive. Make sure they are the owner of the horse, if not who are they? The standard stories are:

It’s my neighbors horse, this often means it is my horse but I am not going to admit it to you, as I don’t want to be held accountable for the lies I’m about to tell you.

Or I’m a dealer trying to pass off this horse as a good old horse so gentle to ride, the neighbor kid rode bareback on the road when in reality it’s a dink horse that he can’t sell off his trading string.

Jack use to saddle up to the person who brought the horse and softly ask; say can you tell me a little bit about your horse? ( then he SHUT UP! ). They would tell all the nice things about the horse and Jack would just look at the horse, not saying a word. After they got through the string of lies or half truths, they would start getting nervous because it was so quite they thought they had to ramble on some more and that’s when a bit more of the truth starts to show up, yeah old Barley don’t buck except that one time when he broke my collar bone opps…

#4 Follow the horse from the pen to the sale ring

Jack use to walk right into the sale ring with the horse and watch it move in the ring too. The other advantage is you can see who is bidding. The owner or someone with them may be running up the bid, you know this because you seen them arrive right?

Now you may not be able to get in the ring but you can stand next to it so you can see the horse and the crowd too. Most owners try too hard to get their horse to ride well in the ring which is usually too small to work a horse in anyway so you get to see how the horse responds under pressure. Watch for rearing, head tossing, humping up or crow hopping, usually the small size of the ring prevents them from bucking.

#5 If you still like the horse bid on it.

How much? Jack would only pay about $15 to $20 above killer price. How much is that? You need to snoop around before the sale and ask the dealers or auctioneer, I’ve seen it range from 15 cents to 1 dollar a pound, so that could mean from $150 to $1000 for a 1000 pound riding horse.

Jack was comfortable paying that price as he would take the horse home, try them out, if there was a problem he would run them through the next auction and not get hurt too bad, out $20 at most.

This works good if you, your wife, or kids don’t fall in love with old Barley, Jack use to say if you don’t send them right back to the auction. you end up with a field full of cripples and buckers.

You can get a nice horse at a rock bottom price following this method. My experience has been that I can get older well trained horses that people are bailing out on because the kids all left home and they don’t want to feed the horse any more, or they just were flash in the pan horsemen and need the money for a quad runner.

I have also bought young unbroke horses that people do not have the skill to train, if you think you want a go at that, make sure you have a medical plan and go for it.

I do not pay top dollar for exceptional horses at auctions because, again experience has taught me there are no exceptional horse at these auctions, if you think there are some there, look close as there is usually a hole in them somewhere.

Now put this plan into action and you will find a nice horse that you can use and even make a profit on if you so choose at some time in the future, just do all the steps and you will get the successful results.

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How I Get More Training Done on My Horses in Half the Time

Here’s a simple way… to help your horse learn twice as fast.

We are all pressed for time, seems there is just not enough of it. There is the job, family duties, maybe social events, all competing for our time. Our horse is ignored and we end up with a 10 year old “greenbroke” horse, which can mean anything from they buck or, spook sometimes, to they still need to be gee-hawed to go left, or right. They may still be trying to figure out go and whoa. Well I have found some easy ways to double the results I get when training horses, you can do the same if you will try.

Tip #1 – Rub you horse all over

You must be able to rub your horse from one end to the other, neither end is more important than the other. You should, be able to handle the mouth and ears as well a rubbing under the tail, start stroking with the hair on each side of the tail. When the horse unclamps the tail and raises it, you can then rub under the tail.

You must be able to do this or you may have to go back and redo the training later, like I did. I had a paint stallion in for training and he already had four months put on him by an other trainer, but he still was spooky and not a nice ride at all. I noticed that he did not like his ears touched but I was trying to hurry and moved on. Three weeks later he threw himself over backwards while being bridled. You better believe I spent about three days on ears 101, then bang he got it and changed, was one laid-back easygoing pussycat from then on.

Be smart and learn to rub your horse, rub don’t pat or slap them, that is not soothing to them. What would you like a back rub or a back slapping?

Tip #2 – Stop punishment when wanted behavior occurs.

Whoa! you say, what’s this punishment talk? Well I would like you to realize there are a multitude of things we do to a horse that are “punishment” in the horses mind, maybe not your mind, but definitely in the horses mind.

Here is a little list of punishments according to the horse:

1. pulling on a rein
2. using a spur
3. using a quirt or whip
4. using a stud chain

Do I want you to quit using the above? No, just stop using them when the horse does anything close to what you want. Let me give you some examples;

You pull the left rein to turn your horse left, the second he starts left quit pulling, if you want to turn left more ask again, as many times as you need to but reward the horse for the try.

You put your spur against your horse to move over, when he moves the slightest amount take that spur out of there, do it again if you have to, but reward that try and soon you won’t even need to wear those spurs as the horse will move off your leg, because you reward that try.

Tip #3 – Reward your horse for the right behavior.

Now you can consider the end of punishment as a reward, and that is true, but the term reward will be used to mean giving something extra to the horse for trying to do the “right” thing. If you can find a way to reward the try in the horse, you will have your dream horse, that partner you wanted or some of you maybe had as a kid. Kids can be givers easier than adults, my grandson gave me a kiss today, my brother never did, because he was almost an adult when I was born. Learn to be a kid again, reward your horse with:

some grain

a soothing voice

a rub on the neck

a drink of clean cool water

a handful of grass

a modern horse treat

a chunk of carrot

a slice of apple

getting off his back

The list is almost endless, the trick is to give the reward at the right time for the right behavior. quit training at the good spots

If you will take the time to follow these tips, you can double the size of your horse training toolbox. You probably already know the punishment side of training use it right and add the reward side to double your training results.

Put your ego aside, be a giver to your horse and they will give back to you in ways you can only imagine.

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Starting Out With a New Hanoverian Sport Horse

The Hanoverian horse has been a consistently popular breed of sport horse for a long time, and for good reason. Hanoverian horses are incredibly lithe, agile and sportive. Hanoverians are renowned for their good temperaments, which makes them easy to train to a great extent. These horses are also highly intelligent and generally form very harmonious relationships with their riders. Hanoverian sport horses are famed worldwide for their awe-inspiring grace and beauty – they possess an infallible combination of muscular limbs, a robust body and an enduringly strong back. Any horse lover, or potential investor in a sport horse would truly be wise to choose a Hanoverian sport horse.

Hanoverian sport horses can be seen at all levels of competitive games, from local horse shows to the Olympic games. In fact, statistics show that the Hanoverian breed is the most successful of all warm blood horse breeds – not surprising when their athleticism and excellent temperament are acknowledged.

Question: I have invested in a fantastic Hanoverian Sport Horse. What is my next step?

First of all, congratulations on your successful investment in a Hanoverian, anyone who has the pleasure of owning one of these horses is guaranteed many years of satisfaction and enjoyment from seeing their horse continually succeed. However, their success does not come automatically. The most important first step to take, once you have purchased your horse, is to organize its training.

High quality training with an experienced trainer is imperative to guarantee your horse’s success in competitive games. It is recommended to conduct ample research on the type of training you wish your horse to receive. Training based on classical teaching principles has proven widely popular. In many cases, the classical teaching principles are applied during training, while the trainer simultaneously forms a specific program based on the unique needs of the horse undergoing training, taking their personality traits and physical strengths into close consideration.

When researching and deciding on the right horse trainer for your Hanoverian horse’s needs, inquire as to the success levels in competitive games of horses that have been previously undergone training with them. This will give you a fair idea of how well the trainer works with horses and caters to their individual needs. It is also very important to introduce your horse to the trainer, and even allow them to take the horse for a ride to gauge how they collaborate with one another. Additionally, it is just as important for you, the horse owner to mesh well with the chosen trainer.

Hanoverian horses are highly intelligent and if they sense any weakness, their training may not be as successful as it could be. In the long run, it is extremely important that your Hanoverian, you and your trainer all connect well to ensure your horse’s maximum success.

Once properly trained, a Hanoverian sport horse is a tremendous opportunity for success and will bring an owner many years of enjoyment.

How to Feed and Breed Horses

Horses are herbivorous and basically exhibit hind gut fermentation. So it is very much essential to exercise proper feeding management in horses so as to obstruct both over feeding and under feeding. The salient features are highlighted regarding feeding.

1. Do not provide non nitrogenous protein substances like urea to horses of all categories as they can not digest like ruminants.

2. Horses should be provided dry matter at least 1.5% of body weight.

3. Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 2.7 for light breeds

Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 3.1 for medium breeds

Body weight (kg)= heart girth (cm)* 3.5 for heavy breeds

4. The most common concentrated feed given to horse are oats, barley, gram and wheat bran.

5. As far as green forage is concerned, best fodder is lucerne (either green or hay).

6. For better utilization and assimilation of nutrients, the whole daily ration may be divided into 4-6 separate meals.

7. Regularity in feeding, avoid full feeding before and after exercise and changing ration composition gradually are most important symbols in horse feeding.

8. In horses it is particular that fodder roughage is given before grains. but if chopped fodder is available then it can be mixed with grains or concentrate.

9. No group feeding is advised as far as grain feeding is concerned.

10. To avoid mineral deficiency, daily 25-40 gm mineral mixture is added with concentrates.

11. A horse (without work) weighing 400 kg body weight will require probably 0.38 kg Digestible crude protein (DCP), 20 gm calcium, 20 gm phosphorous and 70mg carotene.

12. For medium work, it requires 0.86 kg DCP, 50 gm Calcium, 50 gm phosphorous and 135 mg carotene.

13. And for heavy work, it requires 1.10 kg DCP, 60 gm calcium, 60 gm phosphorus and 170 mg carotene.

14. Horses should not be watered at least 20-30 minutes before and after vigorous exercise.

15. The requirement of drinking water is 36liters per day and may vary according to seasons as in summer the demand of water increases.

16. For general practise, it is to provide water before feeding.

17. In general watering schedule, watering should be done three times a day in summer and twice a day in other seasons.

18. Horses are seasonal polyestrous. Early spring is considered as best breeding time in india.

19. puberty is attained at the age of 18 months.

20. Mating should be allowed at 3 yrs of age when it attains 75% of body weight,

21. Eestrous cycle is 21 days and duration of heat is 4-6 days.

22. The should be bred 2 to 3 days after appearance of heat symptoms.

23. The tail of the mare should be bandaged and kept away to one side so as to not interfere during copulation.

24. For breeding, one stallion is sufficient for 30-40 mares.

25. A stallion should be used for 5 times in a week.

26. One most observable sight at the time of parturition is the appearance of beads of wax on teats one or two days before delivery.